Foundation 2 자료실


About Tomb Trek

The Fast ForWord Foundations II exercise Tomb Trek focuses on the following tasks, goals, and skills.

Task. Identify a target word when presented within a sequence of two words.

Goal. Develop the following cognitive and language & reading skills:

Language & reading skills

Word analysis

The ability to recognize words, the ability to recognize the relationship between letters and sounds, and the ability to understand letter patterns.

Phonological accuracy

The ability to make correct distinctions based on individual phonemes (e.g., matching words that begin with the same sound) or other aspects of phonology (e.g., rhyming, number of syllables).

Phonological memory

The capacity for holding speech sounds in memory. This skill is needed for tasks such as comparing phonemes, relating phonemes to letters, or sounding out words. It also helps both listeners and readers understand sentences because it allows them to remember a series of words in order.

Cognitive skills

Memory

The ability to hold a target word in working memory while comparing it to two alternate words to find the matching one.

Attention

The ability to focus attention.

Processing

The ability to process spoken words at the level of phonemes.



About the science

Tomb Trek presents words that differ by initial consonant or final consonant. For example, the words big and dig differ by initial consonant.

Tomb Trek includes Scientific Learning’s patented speech processing technology.

  • At first, Tomb Trek presents words in which the speech sounds have been digitally altered using patented methods (including selective intensity increases) to provide enhanced learning opportunities. Initially, the consonant sounds in each word have been enhanced relative to the vowel sound. For example, the word bid is initially presented with acoustically modified versions of the /b/ and /d/ sounds.
  • As the student progresses through the exercise, Tomb Trek decreases this processing, and eventually presents the words using natural speech.

Note: Foundations I includes all five patented speech processing levels, whereas Foundations II only includes the highest three processing levels (Levels 3-5).



How students use Tomb Trek


Tomb Trek takes place in a vast desert, where Granny (from Moon Ranch) has begun excavating an alien archaeological site. The object of Tomb Trek is to help Granny dig for treasure by identifying a pronounced target word when presented in a sequence of two pronounced and/or written words.

To work on Tomb Trek, the student clicks the Go button to hear a target word. The exercise then presents two words on scrolls above Granny’s chair. One word is the target word, while the other is a phonologically contrasting word. The student must click the scroll that presented the target word.

To help the student move from listening to reading, Tomb Trek changes the task as the student progresses through the speech processing levels in the exercise.


  • Level 3 (more processed). Tomb Trek pronounces the target word. Then, it pronounces two words while briefly displaying them on the screen. This introduces the student to the written forms of words while focusing primarily on listening skills.
  • Level 4 (less processed). Tomb Trek pronounces the target word. Then, it pronounces and displays two words on the screen, without removing them. This reinforces the association between the spoken and written forms of the words, and to use both their reading and listening skills to find target word.
  • Level 5 (natural speech). Tomb Trek pronounces the target word, then displays two words on the screen silently. This requires the student to read the words and no longer rely on hearing them pronounced.

Help. If the student needs assistance identifying words in the highest level, the student can use the Help button. See Help.

Replay button. During each trial, the student can click the Replay button to repeat the stimuli again. The Replay button is only available during a trial.

Time. The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student's protocol. It fills in from left to right as time elapses. When the time requirement is met, the exercise automatically closes and returns to the remaining exercises scheduled for that day. If this is the last exercise for the day, Today’s report opens.

Menu. The student can use this menu to exit the exercise early, to check the network connection status, and to see exactly how much time is left to meet the day’s protocol for that exercise. To learn more see Exiting an exercise.

Keyboard shortcuts. Students who are not able to use a mouse can use the following keyboard shortcuts (not available on touchscreen devices):

  • Go button. Space bar
  • Left scroll (response button). Left arrow
  • Right scroll (response button). Right arrow

Autoplay

To help speed up progress, the student can use Autoplay to take a set of multiple trials with a single click of the Go button. Autoplay becomes available early in the exercise, after the student demonstrates a basic understanding of the concepts (usually after passing a small group of trials). Once introduced, Autoplay turns on by default. The student can turn it off or back on at any time.


When Autoplay is on, the student clicks the Go button one time to start a set of trials. Autoplay always starts with a set of 3 trials. The Autoplay counter shows the number of trials in the current set. If the student gets all of the trials in the set correct, the exercise adds one more trial to the next set. If the student gets any of them incorrect, the component removes one trial from the next set. An Autoplay set will never be less than 3 trials.

The student can earn bonus points by responding correctly to all trials in an Autoplay set. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points after responding correctly to all 3 trials in the set.


Note: Autoplay is not available in the Speed Round.

Speed Round

As the student progresses through the exercise, Tomb Trek presents the Speed Round (or Fluency Round). In the Speed Round, the student identifies target words displayed on a wall of gold bricks.

To work on the Speed Round, the student clicks the Go button to hear a target word pronounced. The top row of gold bricks in the wall highlights and each brick displays a word. The student must click all of the bricks that display the target word. For each correct answer, a gemstone appears in place of the word, and the exercise awards one point. The gemstone is also earned as a token, held by the tool at the bottom of the screen. The student should respond as quickly as possible, without making mistakes, to earn the most points. When the entire row is cleared of target words, the remaining words on the bricks disappear. The next row of bricks in the wall highlights and each brick displays a word. The student must continue identifying bricks with the same target word.

The Speed Round screen displays five rows of bricks. If the last row of bricks is successfully cleared before the Speed Round ends, the first row highlights again and the Speed Round continues as before. However, if a brick with an incorrect word is clicked, or a brick with a target word is missed, all tokens are lost and the Speed Round starts over. At the end of the round, any remaining tokens are awarded as bonus points. When the Speed Round ends, the student returns to the main exercise.

Tip: Tomb Trek tracks student responses during the Speed Round, but does not use this information to advance the student’s standing in the exercise. Instead, the Speed Round is an opportunity for the student to review the material at a faster pace and earn extra points.

Help

At the highest level, if the student needs assistance identifying the written words, the student can use the Help (?) button to see two words at the current set and stage.

  • The student can click the Go button to hear a target word, and click one of two written words to hear that word pronounced.
  • Using Help does not affect the student’s standing in Tomb Trek.



How students progress in Tomb Trek


Introduction

Tomb Trek starts with an interactive demonstration that introduces the exercise. The introduction will not be presented again.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Progression

In Tomb Trek, the student progresses through three speech processing levels in the exercise.

Within each level, the student progresses through 42 word sets. These sets are organized around 6 consonant sounds: /b/, /p/, /d/, /t/, /g/, and /k/. There are 4 sets for each sound in the initial position (e.g., bid vs. did) and three sets for each sound in the final position (e.g., bid vs. bit).

Although the same number of sets is presented at each level, the actual words presented may vary, to provide experience working with different words and improve generalization. The following table “Word group and set examples” shows the total number of sets presented across levels.

ClosedWord group and set examples


Each word set includes 3 stages, depending on the student’s performance (see Advancement). In each stage, the phoneme is changed to make the target word harder to discriminate from the alternate response.

  • Stage 1 presents easier alternate responses (bit vs. bit)
  • Stage 2 presents harder alternate responses (bit vs. bib)
  • Stage 3 presents the hardest alternate response (bit vs. bid)

After the student completes 3 sets at the highest stage, the student works on the Speed Round.


Advancement

In Tomb Trek, the student must meet the following criteria to advance in the exercise:

  • In each set, the student starts at the highest stage (Stage 3). To advance to the next word within a set, the student must answer 3 of the last 4 trials correctly. When doing well, the student may be allowed to skip some stages. When struggling, the student may need to work on all three stages.
  • To advance to the next level, the student must pass all sets at the highest stage. 
  • When the student completes the highest level in Tomb Trek, the exercise is complete.

Tomb Trek adapts to student performance within each set, and will administer targeted interventions if the student fails a stage. If a student keeps failing a set, they will be moved to a new set. The failed set will be revisited at a later time.


Interventions

The exercises use built-in, responsive technology to detect when a student is struggling and administer targeted, inline instruction—right when the student needs it—without any external resources or assistance required. This “smart learning” design helps reduce frustration as it quickly gets students back on track, where they can continue making progress and achieving gains.

Tomb Trek provides a variety of in-exercise interventions when needed, such as:

  • Coaching
  • Modified progression
  • Guided Help (the Tomb Trek Help screen with guided instruction)

The student can receive 1 or 2 of these interventions at a time, depending on the task and difficulty level in which the student is struggling. Each one can take anywhere from a few seconds to 2-3 minutes to complete. When appropriate, the student’s progression in the exercise stops temporarily while working through an intervention, then resumes when the student returns to the regular exercise content.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Mastery

To complete the exercise, the student must master all of the skills in the exercise and reach a percent complete score of 100%. If the exercise is revisited, the student will continue to repeat the content at the highest levels. To learn more see Completing a component.



How Tomb Trek rewards progress

Session points. The exercise awards points as follows:

  • 2 points for each correct response
  • 5 points for each correct response in the Speed Round
  • 3 bonus points for completing a stage
  • 4 bonus points for completing a set
  • 20 bonus points for completing a level
  • During Autoplay, students earn double the usual amount of points when they complete a set of trials without any errors. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points.


Feeder meter. The feeder meter tracks and celebrates every 1% of content completion. At 10% complete, the meter is full, and it “feeds” that percentage into the progress meter and resets. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report

Progress meter. The progress meter tracks and celebrates every 10% of content completion. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all 10 markers light up, the exercise is complete. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Completion status. The completion status sign shows the actual percent complete score for the exercise. The score updates each time the student completes 1%. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Current streak (3 in a row). At the start of each new session, the exercise tracks and shows the current “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. After 3 consecutive correct trials in a session, a “3 in a row” sign slides onto the screen. The score increments until the streak is broken (on the first incorrect trial), at which point the sign disappears from view. The current streak sign resets to zero at the end of each streak, and at the start of the next session.

Highest streak. At the start of each new day, the exercise tracks and shows the student’s best “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. The score appears after the first 3 consecutive correct trials, and remains on the screen throughout the day. Any time the student surpasses his or her highest streak that day, the sign updates to show the latest number. The highest streak score resets to zero at the start of the next day.

More rewards. In addition to the current streak sign, the exercise uses other fun animations to encourage progress.

  • Granny’s toolbox represents the consecutive correct counter. After the first correct response, the toolbox opens and a tool appears. After the next consecutive correct response, the tool prepares to work on the wall. When the student answers the third consecutive trial correctly, the tool uncovers an alien glyph, an artifact, or a button that triggers a fun animation and returns to the toolbox. When all of the items in the scene are uncovered, a reward animation plays and Granny moves to the next room.
  • Each work session includes a performance goal to help motivate the student. In Tomb Trek, the student’s goal is to advance to the treasure room and earn treasure. When the student meets the goal, the treasure room opens and more treasure appears in the room. Once earned, these rewards cannot be lost; the treasure will remain visible until the entire component is finished.


About Polar Planet

The Fast ForWord Foundations II exercise Polar Planet focuses on the following tasks, goals, and skills.

Task. Identify a target word when presented within a series of words.

Goal. Develop the following cognitive and language & reading skills:

Language & reading skills

Word analysis

The ability to recognize words, the ability to recognize the relationship between letters and sounds, and the ability to understand letter patterns.

Phonological fluency

The ability to understand that words are composed of different sounds, including the ability to identify and manipulate those sounds in a quick and efficient manner. This skill facilitates both spelling words and decoding them.

Print awareness

The ability to visually track from left to right, as required during reading.

Cognitive skills

Memory

The ability to hold a sound sequence in working memory while recalling symbol-sound associations from long-term memory.

Attention

The ability to focus and sustain attention.

Processing

The ability to process spoken and written words.



About the science

Polar Planet presents words that differ by initial consonant or final consonant. For example, the words big and dig differ by initial consonant.

Polar Planet includes Scientific Learning’s patented speech processing technology.

  • At first, Polar Planet presents words in which the speech sounds have been digitally altered using patented methods (including selective intensity increases) to provide enhanced learning opportunities. Initially, the consonant sounds in each word have been enhanced relative to the vowel sound. For example, the word bid is initially presented with acoustically modified versions of the /b/ and /d/ sounds.
  • As the student progresses through the exercise, Polar Planet decreases this processing, and eventually presents the words using natural speech.

Note: Foundations I includes all five patented speech processing levels, whereas Foundations II only includes the highest three processing levels (Levels 3-5).



How students use Polar Planet


Polar Planet takes place on the surface of a frozen world. The object of the exercise is to help the polar penguin build ice machines by correctly identifying a target word when presented within a series of similar words.

To work on Polar Planet, the student clicks the Go button to start. Polar Planet presents a target word, then presents a series of words associated with ice blocks that move from left to right. The student must click the ice block when they hear and /or read the target word.

To help the student move from listening to reading, Polar Planet changes the task as the student progresses through the speech processing levels in the exercise.

  • Level 3 (more processed). Polar Planet pronounces the target word and displays it briefly on the screen. Then it pronounces a series of words. This introduces the student to reading while focusing primarily on listening skills.
  • Level 4 (less processed). Polar Planet pronounces the target word, then it pronounces and displays a series of words that move across the screen. This helps the student associate the spoken and written forms of the words, without requiring independent reading.
  • Level 5 (natural speech).Polar Planet pronounces the target word, then displays a series of words across the screen. This task requires independent reading.

At the highest level of the exercise, Polar Planet introduces the student to rapid word recognition by letting the student change the speed of the exercise. This feature appears when the student demonstrates proficiency at the standard pace by answering 6 of the last 8 trials correctly, and provides agency by letting the student control how fast the stimuli move across the screen.

  • Cool. This is the standard pace in this level.
  • Icy. This is a slightly faster pace, to challenge the student.
  • Polar Cold. This is the fastest pace allowed in the exercise.


The student must be careful and not make too many mistakes at the higher speeds, or Polar Planet will move the student back to Cool for more practice at the standard pace. To regain access to the higher speeds, the student must again demonstrate proficiency (6 of the last 8 trials correct).

Help. If the student needs assistance identifying words in the highest level, the student can use the Help button. See Help.

 Time.The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student's protocol. It fills in from left to right as time elapses. When the time requirement is met, the exercise automatically closes and returns to the remaining exercises scheduled for that day. If this is the last exercise for the day, Today’s report opens.

Menu. The student can use this menu to exit the exercise early, to check the network connection status, and to see exactly how much time is left to meet the day’s protocol for that exercise. To learn more see Exiting an exercise.

Keyboard shortcuts. Students who are not able to use a mouse can use the following keyboard shortcuts (not available on touchscreen devices):

  • Go button. Space bar
  • Target word (response button). Down arrow
Autoplay

To help speed up progress, the student can use Autoplay to take a set of multiple trials with a single click of the Go button. Autoplay becomes available early in the exercise, after the student demonstrates a basic understanding of the concepts (usually after passing a small group of trials). Once introduced, Autoplay turns on by default. The student can turn it off or back on at any time.

When Autoplay is on, the student clicks the Go button one time to start a set of trials. Autoplay always starts with a set of 3 trials. The Autoplay counter shows the number of trials in the current set. If the student gets all of the trials in the set correct, the exercise adds one more trial to the next set. If the student gets any of them incorrect, the component removes one trial from the next set. An Autoplay set will never be less than 3 trials.

The student can earn bonus points by responding correctly to all trials in an Autoplay set. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points after responding correctly to all 3 trials in the set.

Note: Autoplay is not available in the Speed Round.

Speed Round

As the student progresses in the exercise, Paint Match presents the Speed Round (or Fluency Round). In the Speed Round, the student identifies target words within groups of similar words.

To work on the Speed Round, the student clicks the Go button to hear a target word pronounced. A series of words are pronounced and displayed on four ice blocks, one at a time, from left to right. The student must identify and click the ice block that presents the target word. For each target word identified, the Speed Round awards points and the student earns that ice block. If the student answers all three trials correctly, those ice blocks are transported to the structure. The student should respond as accurately as possible to earn the most points. When the Speed Round ends, the student returns to the main exercise.

Tip: Polar Planet tracks student responses during the Speed Round, but does not use this information to advance the student’s standing in the exercise. Instead, the Speed Round is an opportunity for the student to review the material and earn extra points.

Help

At the highest level, if the student needs assistance identifying the written words, the student can use the Help (?) button to see four words at the current set and stage.

  • The student can click the Go button to hear a target word, and click one of four written words to select that word.
  • The student can click a speaker to hear that word pronounced.
  • Using Help does not affect the student’s standing in Polar Planet.



How students progress in Polar Planet


Introduction

Polar Planet starts with an interactive demonstration that introduces the exercise. The introduction will not be presented again.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.

Progression

In Polar Planet, the student progresses through three speech processing levels in the exercise. Within each level, the student progresses through 54 word sets. The sets are organized around 6 target sounds (/b/, /p/, /t/, /d/, /g/, /k/) and 2 target sound positions, initial (bid vs. did) and final (bid vs. bit).

  • Level 3 presents 54 word sets
  • Level 4 presents 54 word sets
  • Level 5 presents 54 word sets with speed control

ClosedWord group and set examples


Each word set includes 3 stages, depending on the student’s performance (see Advancement).

  • Stage 1 presents easier alternate responses (gab vs. lab)
  • Stage 2 presents harder alternate responses (gab vs. cab)
  • Stage 3 presents mixed alternate responses (gab vs. lab, cab, and jab)

After the student completes 3 sets at the highest stage, the student works on the Speed Round.


Advancement

In Polar Planet, the student must meet the following criteria to advance in the exercise:

  • In each set, the student starts at the highest stage (Stage 3). Stages 1 and 2 are reserved for students who demonstrate difficulty discriminating particular sounds.
  • To advance to the next stage within a set, the student must answer 3 of the last 4 trials correctly. If the student does not answer at least 2 of the first 8 trials correctly, or cannot pass the stage within 15 trials, the stage is failed. When doing well, the student may be allowed to skip Stages 1 and 2. When struggling, the student will need to work on all 3 stages.
  • To advance to the next level, the student must pass all sets at the highest stage. 
  • When the student completes the highest level in Polar Planet, the exercise is complete.

Polar Planet adapts to student performance within each set, and may transition to a new set if the student is repeatedly failing stages in a set. The set will be revisited at a later time.


Interventions

The exercises use built-in, responsive technology to detect when a student is struggling and administer targeted, inline instruction—right when the student needs it—without any external resources or assistance required. This “smart learning” design helps reduce frustration as it quickly gets students back on track, where they can continue making progress and achieving gains.

Polar Planet provides a variety of in-exercise interventions when needed, such as:

  • Coaching
  • Alternative instructions and stimuli
  • Modified progression
  • Focus mode (a simplified exercise screen with minimal elements and motivational features to minimize distractions)
  • Guided Help (the Polar Planet Help screen with guided instruction)

The student can receive 1 or 2 of these interventions at a time, depending on the task and difficulty level in which the student is struggling. Each one can take anywhere from a few seconds to 2-3 minutes to complete. When appropriate, the student’s progression in the exercise stops temporarily while working through an intervention, then resumes when the student returns to the regular exercise content.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Mastery

To complete the exercise, the student must master all of the skills in the exercise and reach a percent complete score of 100%. If the exercise is revisited, the student will continue to repeat the content at the highest levels. To learn more see Completing a component.



How Polar Planet rewards progress

Session points. The exercise awards points as follows:

  • 2 points for each correct response
  • 1 point for each correct response in the Speed Round, and 2 points for every gem uncovered
  • 3 bonus points for completing a set
  • 20 bonus points for completing a level
  • 3 bonus points for each coin uncovered on the tomb wall
  • During Autoplay, students earn double the usual amount of points when they complete a set of trials without any errors. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points.

Feeder meter. The feeder meter tracks and celebrates every 1% of content completion. At 10% complete, the meter is full, and it “feeds” that percentage into the progress meter and resets. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report

Progress meter. The progress meter tracks and celebrates every 10% of content completion. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all 10 markers light up, the exercise is complete. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Completion status. The completion status sign shows the actual percent complete score for the exercise. The score updates each time the student completes 1%. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Current streak (3 in a row). At the start of each new session, the exercise tracks and shows the current “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. After 3 consecutive correct trials in a session, a “3 in a row” sign slides onto the screen. The score increments until the streak is broken (on the first incorrect trial), at which point the sign disappears from view. The current streak sign resets to zero at the end of each streak, and at the start of the next session.

Highest streak. At the start of each new day, the exercise tracks and shows the student’s best “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. The score appears after the first 3 consecutive correct trials, and remains on the screen throughout the day. Any time the student surpasses his or her highest streak that day, the sign updates to show the latest number. The highest streak score resets to zero at the start of the next day.

Speed control panel. At the highest level of the exercise, Polar Planet provides a control panel that lets the student control the speed of the exercise.

More rewards. In addition to the current streak sign, the exercise uses other fun animations to encourage progress.

  • The ice blocks in the sled indicate the number of consecutive correct responses. After each consecutive correct response, the penguin hits the ice block into the sled. When the student answers three consecutive trials correctly, the sled transports the three ice blocks to the glacier. The blocks are used to build fun ice structures.
  • Each work session includes a performance goal to help motivate the student. In Polar Planet, the student’s goal is to complete a structure. When the student meets the goal, a flag appears on the ice planet. Once earned, these rewards cannot be lost; the flags will remain visible until the entire component is finished.

About Paint Match


The Fast ForWord Foundations II exercise Paint Match focuses on the following tasks, goals, and skills.

Task. Match all the words into pairs using the fewest attempts.

Goal. Develop the following cognitive and language & reading skills:

Language & reading skills

Word analysis

The ability to recognize words, the ability to recognize the relationship between letters and sounds, and the ability to understand letter patterns.

Phonological accuracy

The ability to make correct distinctions based on individual phonemes (e.g., matching words that begin with the same sound) or other aspects of phonology (e.g., rhyming, number of syllables).

Cognitive skills

Memory

The ability to use auditory and visual-spatial working memory to locate matching word pairs in a grid.

Attention

The ability to focus and sustain attention.

Processing

The ability to process spoken and written words.



About the science

Paint Match presents words that differ by a single consonant, consonant cluster, or vowel. For example, the words clock and block differ by initial consonant cluster. As the student progresses through the content, the differences occur at the beginning, ending, or middle of the words. At the highest level, Paint Match also presents “alien” words—nonsense words that use basic English spelling patterns—to encourage accurate decoding for unfamiliar words. For details see the content list.

Paint Match includes Scientific Learning’s patented speech processing technology.

  • At first, Paint Match presents words in which the speech sounds have been digitally altered using patented methods (including selective intensity increases) to provide enhanced learning opportunities. Initially, the consonant sounds in each word have been enhanced relative to the vowel sound. For example, the word bit is initially presented with acoustically modified versions of the /b/ and /t/ sounds.
  • As the student progresses through the exercise, Paint Match decreases this processing, and eventually presents the words using natural speech.

Note: Foundations I includes all five patented speech processing levels, whereas Foundations II only includes the highest three processing levels (Levels 3-5).



How students use Paint Match

Paint Match displays paint tubes in grids of four, eight, and sixteen. Each paint tube has a word associated with it. The object of Paint Match is to match all the words into pairs in the fewest attempts.

To work on Paint Match, the student clicks a paint tube on the screen. The exercise pronounces a word and displays that word on the tube. The student must click the other paint tubes on the screen to find the paint tube with the matching word. If the student clicks a new paint tube that matches one already clicked, the word is pronounced but not displayed. The student must then go back and click the first paint tube of the pair to confirm the match. The two paint tubes disappear.

In Paint Match, the student starts out matching words. As the student progresses, Paint Match introduces nonsense words. The color of the paint tubes indicates which word type the student is currently working on:

 Actual words = green paint tubes

 Nonsense words = orange paint tubes

Click counter. The number on the fox’s space suit represents the number of attempts available to match all of the paint tubes in the grid. Each time the student clicks a paint tube, this number is reduced by one, and one of the tokens on the paint palette disappears. When the student matches all of the paint tubes on the screen within the allowed number of attempts, the exercise awards the remaining tokens as bonus points. If the counter reaches zero before the student has made all the matches, the grid closes and the student starts over with a new grid.

Time. The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student's protocol. It fills in from left to right as time elapses. When the time requirement is met, the exercise automatically closes and returns to the remaining exercises scheduled for that day. If this is the last exercise for the day, Today’s report opens.

Menu. The student can use this menu to exit the exercise early, to check the network connection status, and to see exactly how much time is left to meet the day’s protocol for that exercise. To learn more see Exiting an exercise.

Speed Round

As the student progresses in the exercise, Paint Match presents the Speed Round (or Fluency Round). In the Speed Round, the student identifies target words within groups of similar words.

To work on the Speed Round, the student clicks the Go button to hear a target word pronounced. Words appear on the picture frames in the top row, one at a time, from left to right. When the target word appears on a picture frame, the student must click the target word. The student should respond as quickly as possible, without making mistakes, to earn the most points.

When the student finds all the target words on the Speed Round screen correctly, the student earns tokens, which appear as lights above the picture frames. The paintbrush token indicates the highest token ever earned. If an incorrect word is painted, or a target word is missed, all tokens are lost and the Speed Round starts over. At the end of the Speed Round, any remaining tokens are awarded as bonus points. When the Speed Round ends, the student returns to the main exercise.

Paint Match tracks student responses during the Speed Round, but does not use this information to advance the student’s standing in the exercise. Instead, the Speed Round is an opportunity for the student to review the material at a faster pace and earn extra points.



How students progress in Paint Match


Introduction

Paint Match starts with an interactive demonstration that introduces the exercise. The introduction will not be presented again.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Progression

In Paint Match, the student progresses through content across three speech processing levels. Each level includes sets of words grouped by different sound changes.

  • In Levels 3 and 4 (processed speech), the student progresses through the same three groups.
  • In Level 5 (natural speech), the student progresses through all groups, alternating between groups of real words and nonsense words.

ClosedWord groups and sets


Within each set, the student progresses through 6 stages. Each stage includes a specific grid size:

  • Stages 1-2 presents 3x3 grids of 8 tiles (4 matches)
  • Stages 3-6 presents 4x4 grids of 16 tiles (8 matches)


Advancement

In Paint Match, the student must meet the following criteria to advance in the exercise:

  • To advance to the next stage within a set, the student must pass the current stage by making all of the matches within the allowed number of clicks (or touches on a touch-screen device). The student can track remaining attempts on the click counter. If the student runs out of clicks before making all of the matches, the student is demoted one stage.
    • 3x3 grids. Up to 20 clicks allowed
    • 4x4 grids. Up to 60 clicks allowed
  • To advance to the next set within a level, the student must pass the highest stage. Paint Match adapts to the student’s performance within each set, and will transition the student to the next set if the student repeatedly fails in the early stages. The set will be revisited later in the level.
  • To advance to the next level, the student must pass all sets in the current level.


Interventions

The exercises use built-in, responsive technology to detect when a student is struggling and administer targeted, inline instruction—right when the student needs it—without any external resources or assistance required. This “smart learning” design helps reduce frustration as it quickly gets students back on track, where they can continue making progress and achieving gains.

Paint Match provides a variety of in-exercise interventions when needed, such as:

  • Coaching
  • Modeling
  • Motivations

The student can receive 1 or 2 of these interventions at a time, depending on the task and difficulty level in which the student is struggling. Each one can take anywhere from a few seconds to 2-3 minutes to complete. When appropriate, the student’s progression in the exercise stops temporarily while working through an intervention, then resumes when the student returns to the regular exercise content.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Mastery

To complete the exercise, the student must master all of the skills in the exercise and reach a percent complete score of 100%. If the exercise is revisited, the student will continue to repeat the content at the highest levels. To learn more see Completing a component.



How Paint Match rewards progress

Session points. The exercise awards points as follows:

  • 1 point for each correct match
  • After completing a grid, any remaining clicks are awarded as bonus points
  • After completing the Fluency round, any remaining tokens are awarded as bonus points
  • 20 bonus points for completing a speech processing level

Feeder meter. The feeder meter tracks and celebrates every 1% of content completion. At 10% complete, the meter is full, and it “feeds” that percentage into the progress meter and resets. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report

Progress meter. The progress meter tracks and celebrates every 10% of content completion. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all 10 markers light up, the exercise is complete. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Completion status. The completion status sign shows the actual percent complete score for the exercise. The score updates each time the student completes 1%. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Highest streak. At the start of each new day, the exercise tracks and shows the student’s best “winning streak” of consecutive grids passed. The score appears early in the exercise, and remains on the screen throughout the day. Any time the student surpasses his or her highest streak that day, the sign updates to show the latest number. The highest streak score resets to zero at the start of the next day.

More rewards. In addition to the current streak sign, the exercise uses other fun animations to encourage progress.

  • Each work session includes a performance goal to help motivate the student. In Paint Match, the student’s goal is to clear more than five grids within the allowed number of attempts per grid. As the student works toward the goal, an alien rabbit leaves tracks in the snow. When the student meets the goal, the rabbit’s ears appear behind the hill. Once earned, these rewards cannot be lost; the rabbit ears will remain visible until the entire component is finished.



About Jumper Gym

The Fast ForWord Foundations I exercise Jumper Gym focuses on the following tasks, goals, and skills.

Task. Identify a sequence of sound sweeps.

Goal. Develop the following cognitive and language & reading skills:


Language & reading skills

Advanced listening accuracy

The ability to distinguish differences between sounds and to correctly identify sequences of up to five sounds. This skill enables learners to recognize and discriminate the rapidly changing sounds that are important for discriminating phonemes.

Auditory sequencing

The ability to recognize and remember the order in which a series of sounds is presented, which is critical for mapping sound sequences to letter sequences when decoding or spelling.

Cognitive skills

Memory

The ability to hold a sound sequence in working memory while recalling visual symbol-sound associations from long-term memory.

Attention

The ability to focus and sustain attention.

Processing

The ability to process tonal sweeps (auditory skill building).

Sequencing

The ability to identify and reproduce a sequence of rapidly presented sounds.



About the science

Jumper Gym presents sound sweeps using different frequency ranges, different sequences of sounds, and different time durations. The frequencies and durations of the sound sweeps correspond to some of the rapid transitions in the sounds of the English language.


Frequency. Jumper Gym presents sound sweeps in 3 frequency ranges, measured in Hertz (Hz).

  • High frequency (2000 Hz)
  • Middle frequency (1000 Hz)
  • Low frequency (500 Hz)

Duration. Jumper Gym presents 2 to 5 sound sweep durations in each frequency range, measured in milliseconds (ms).

  • Long (80 ms)
  • Short (30 ms)










For example, an 80 ms duration represents a sound sweep that lasts for 80 milliseconds. As the student progresses in a frequency, Jumper Gym decreases the duration of the sound sweeps and the length of time between the sound sweeps (inter-stimulus-interval or ISI), challenging the student to improve his or her rate of auditory processing.



How students use Jumper Gym

The object of Jumper Gym is to help Tumbalina the gymnast perform tumbling tricks by correctly identifying sequences of sound sweeps.

To work on Jumper Gym, the student clicks the Go button to hear a sequence of sound sweeps. A sound sweep is classified as weep (a sound sweep that goes up, from lower to higher frequency) or woop (a sound sweep that goes down, from higher to lower frequency). The student must then click the up arrow or down arrow to to reproduce the sequence of sound sweeps correctly. For example:

  • If the exercise presents an up sweep and then a down sweep (“weep, woop”), the student must click the up arrow once, and then click the down arrow once.
  • If the exercise presents two down sweeps (“woop, woop”), the student must click the down arrow twice.

At first, Jumper Gym presents sequences of two sound sweeps. As the student progresses in the exercise, Jumper Gym presents sequences of three, four, and five sound sweeps. The markers to the right of the response buttons indicate the number of sound sweeps in the current sound sequence (two to five). More bonus points are awarded as the number of sound sweeps increases in the exercise.

Replay button. During each trial, the student can click the Replay button to repeat the stimuli again. The Replay button is only available during a trial.

Help. If the student needs assistance identifying the sound sweeps, the student can use the Help button. See Help.

Time. The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student's protocol. It fills in from left to right as time elapses. When the time requirement is met, the exercise automatically closes and returns to the remaining exercises scheduled for that day. If this is the last exercise for the day, Today’s report opens.

Menu. The student can use this menu to exit the exercise early, to check the network connection status, and to see exactly how much time is left to meet the day’s protocol for that exercise. To learn more see Exiting an exercise.

Keyboard shortcuts. Students who are not able to use a mouse can use the following keyboard shortcuts (not available on touchscreen devices):

  • Go button. Space bar
  • Up arrow (weep response button). Up arrow
  • Down arrow (woop response button). Down arrow
Autoplay

To help speed up progress, the student can use Autoplay to take a set of multiple trials with a single click of the Go button. Autoplay becomes available early in the exercise, after the student demonstrates a basic understanding of the concepts (usually after passing a small group of trials). Once introduced, Autoplay turns on by default. The student can turn it off or back on at any time.

When Autoplay is on, the student clicks the Go button one time to start a set of trials. Autoplay always starts with a set of 3 trials. The Autoplay counter shows the number of trials in the current set. If the student gets all of the trials in the set correct, the exercise adds one more trial to the next set. If the student gets any of them incorrect, the component removes one trial from the next set. An Autoplay set will never be less than 3 trials.

The student can earn bonus points by responding correctly to all trials in an Autoplay set. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points after responding correctly to all 3 trials in the set.

Help

If the student needs assistance identifying the sound sweeps, the student can use the Help (?) button to see all possible sequences of sound sweeps at the current frequency (Hz), duration (length of each sound sweep), ISI (time between sound sweeps), and number of sound sweeps.

  • When the Help screen opens, the student can click the Go button to hear the current sequence of sound sweeps.
  • To change the pattern of sound sweeps to another pattern—for example, to change two up sweeps to one up sweep and one down sweep—the student can use the Change Pattern button.
  • To customize Help, the student can use the buttons at the bottom of the screen choose to only play sounds, without any visual cues, or to play sounds and show responses.
  • The student should use the Exit button in the upper right to return to Jumper Gym (rather than the menu, which exits the exercise).
  • Using Help does not affect the student’s standing in Jumper Gym.



How students progress in Jumper Gym


Introduction

Jumper Gym starts with a preparatory stage for each frequency sweep in the exercise. When the student masters the preparatory stage for all three frequencies, the exercise automatically begins. The preparatory stage will not be revisited again.

Tip: You can choose to present the introductions, instructions, and any interventions in another language, if needed. See Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.


Progression

In Jumper Gym, students progress through multiple sound-stimulus sets as follows.

  • Each of the three levels includes multiple sets of sound sweeps that share the same base frequency (500 Hz, 1000 Hz, and 2000 Hz). The student focuses on one level at a time.
  • Each set presents sound sweeps at a specific duration. Early in the exercise, sets include sound sweeps at the longest duration (80 ms). As the student progresses, sets include sound sweeps at the shortest duration (30 ms).
  • Within each set, the time between the sound sweeps (inter-stimulus intervals or ISIs) decreases across 23 stages, starting at 500 ms ISI and ending at 20 ms ISI.
  • As the student progresses in the exercise, the number of sound sweeps increases from 2 to 3, 4, and 5 sweeps.


Advancement

In Jumper Gym, the student must meet the following criteria to advance in the exercise:

  • To advance to the next (ISI) stage within a stimulus set, students must answer 3 consecutive trials correctly. If students answer a trial incorrectly, students move back one ISI stage.
  • To complete Jumper Gym, the student must pass all stimulus sets at each of the three frequencies at the highest stage (ISI 20ms).

Jumper Gym adapts to student performance within each stimulus set, and will transition to a new set if the student is continuously moving between the same few stages in a set. The set will be revisited at a later time.


Mastery

To complete the exercise, the student must master all of the skills in the exercise and reach a percent complete score of 100%. If the exercise is revisited, the student will continue to repeat the content at the highest levels. To learn more see Completing a component.



How Jumper Gym rewards progress

Session points. The exercise awards points as follows:

  • 1 point for each correct response
  • Bonus points are earned after 10 correct responses, based on the current number of sound sweeps:
    • 5 points (2 sound sweeps)
    • 10 points (3 sound sweeps)
    • 15 points (4 sound sweeps)
    • 25 points (5 sound sweeps)
  • During Autoplay, students earn double the usual amount of points when they complete a set of trials without any errors. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points.

Feeder meter. The feeder meter tracks and celebrates every 1% of content completion. At 10% complete, the meter is full, and it “feeds” that percentage into the progress meter and resets. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report

Progress meter. The progress meter tracks and celebrates every 10% of content completion. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all 10 markers light up, the exercise is complete. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Completion status. The completion status sign shows the actual percent complete score for the exercise. The score updates each time the student completes 1%. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Current streak (3 in a row). At the start of each new session, the exercise tracks and shows the current “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. After 3 consecutive correct trials in a session, a “3 in a row” sign slides onto the screen. The score increments until the streak is broken (on the first incorrect trial), at which point the sign disappears from view. The current streak sign resets to zero at the end of each streak, and at the start of the next session.

Highest streak. At the start of each new day, the exercise tracks and shows the student’s best “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. The score appears after the first 3 consecutive correct trials, and remains on the screen throughout the day. Any time the student surpasses his or her highest streak that day, the sign updates to show the latest number. The highest streak score resets to zero at the start of the next day.


More rewards. In addition to the current streak sign, the exercise uses other fun animations to encourage progress.


  • Jumper Gym presents multiple scenes in which the gymnast can perform her tumbling tricks. Each session presents one scene, which includes a special jumping machine designed for that scene. As the student progresses in the session, the machine transforms and the gymnast’s tumbling tricks become more elaborate.
  • The three vents on the power generator light up to indicate the number of consecutive correct responses. When the student answers three consecutive trials correctly, the generator powerball accumulates more energy and the counter resets.
  • At the start of each work session, a portion of the workout scene is revealed with each set of three consecutive correct responses. When the scene is completely revealed, the powerball door opens and a jumping machine moves into place. Subsequently, sets of consecutive correct responses cause the powerball to grow in size, the gymnast to perform tumbling tricks, and modifications to occur to the machine.
  • Each work session includes a performance goal to help motivate the student. In Jumper Gym, the student’s goal is to light all of the lights under the jumping machine. When the student meets that goal in a session, a golden trophy appears in the trophy shelf. Once earned, these rewards cannot be lost; the trophies will remain visible until the entire component is finished.
About Cosmic Reader

The Fast ForWord Foundations II exercise Cosmic Reader focuses on the following tasks, goals, and skills.

Task. Listen to a story while looking at pictures, and then answer questions and follow instructions related to that story.

Goal. Develop the following cognitive and language & reading skills:

Language & reading skills

Listening comprehension

The ability to understand successive sentences and derive meaning from a story.

Following directions

The ability to listen to spoken directions of increasing length and complexity, comprehend them, and keep them in memory long enough to plan and carry out the required action.

English grammar

The ability to understand the elements of the English language including proper word order, syntax, vocabulary, prefixes and suffixes, plurals, and subject-verb agreement.

Vocabulary

The understanding of words in terms of meaning, phonological structure, and grammatical role.

Cognitive skills

Memory

The ability to hold a statement, question, or instruction in working memory while retrieving picture-concept associations from long-term memory and identifying the best response.

Attention

The ability to sustain and focus attention.

Processing

The ability to process spoken sentences and complex images (auditory, visual, and linguistic skill building).

Sequencing

The ability to use word order to comprehend simple and complex sentences, questions, and instructions and to organize a response that follows a specified sequence of actions.

About the science

Cosmic Reader includes three stories across three speech processing levels. It presents the first story with the speech sounds digitally altered using patented methods (including selective intensity increases) to provide enhanced learning opportunities. The consonant sounds in each word have been enhanced relative to the vowel sound. For example, the word cat is initially presented with acoustically modified versions of the /k/ and /t/ sounds. As the student progresses through the stories, Cosmic Reader decreases this processing and eventually presents the last story using natural speech.

  • Level 3 (more processed). Chicken Licken
  • Level 4 (less processed). Big Bad Pigs
  • Level 5 (natural speech). Little Red


Note: Foundations I includes all five patented speech processing levels, whereas Foundations II only includes the highest three processing levels (Levels 3-5).




How students use Cosmic Reader

The object of Cosmic Reader is to listen to a story while looking at pictures, and then answer questions and follow instructions related to that story. It comprises three stories: Chicken Licken, Big Bad Pigs, and Little Red. Each story presents 4 chapters, and each chapter includes 3 activities:

  • Listening Comprehension. Presents a chapter of the story, then presents questions that test the comprehension of the story
  • English Grammar. Presents questions that test the comprehension of sentences
  • Following Directions. Presents activities that test the ability to comprehend and follow directions

When the student completes all three activities in a chapter, Cosmic Reader presents the next chapter in the current story. This continues until all four chapters in the current story are completed. Each activity is detailed as follows.

  • ClosedListening Comprehension
  • ClosedEnglish Grammar
  • ClosedFollowing Directions

Replay button. During each trial, the student can click the Replay button to repeat the stimuli again. The Replay button is only available during a trial.

Keyboard shortcuts. Students who are not able to use a mouse can use keyboard shortcuts in the first two activities, Listening Comprehension and English Grammar (not available on touchscreen devices).

  • Go button. Space bar
  • Responses, top left to bottom right. Number keys 1 through 4

Time. The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student's protocol. It fills in from left to right as time elapses. When the time requirement is met, the exercise automatically closes and returns to the remaining exercises scheduled for that day. If this is the last exercise for the day, Today’s report opens.

Menu. The student can use this menu to exit the exercise early, to check the network connection status, and to see exactly how much time is left to meet the day’s protocol for that exercise. To learn more see Exiting an exercise.

Autoplay

To help speed up progress, the student can use Autoplay to take a set of multiple trials with a single click of the Go button. Autoplay becomes available early in the exercise, after the student demonstrates a basic understanding of the concepts (usually after passing a small group of trials). Once introduced, Autoplay turns on by default. The student can turn it off or back on at any time.

When Autoplay is on, the student clicks the Go button one time to start a set of trials. Autoplay always starts with a set of 3 trials. The Autoplay counter shows the number of trials in the current set. If the student gets all of the trials in the set correct, the exercise adds one more trial to the next set. If the student gets any of them incorrect, the component removes one trial from the next set. An Autoplay set will never be less than 3 trials.

The student can earn bonus points by responding correctly to all trials in an Autoplay set. For example, in a set of 3 trials, if each trial earns 2 points, the student would earn 6 bonus points after responding correctly to all 3 trials in the set.



How students progress in Cosmic Reader


Progression

In Cosmic Reader, the student works on 3 different stories, each at a different speech processing level. Each story is divided into 4 chapters. After listening to a chapter narration, the student progresses through 3 activities in that chapter, as follows:

  • Listening Comprehension. In each chapter, the student works on 4 listening comprehension questions, for a total of 16 per story.
  • English Grammar. In each chapter, the student works on 36 English grammar items, for a total of 144 per story. Each story presents 31 grammatical structures, ranging in difficulty from early developing structures (for example, comparative with -er: “The basket is bigger”) to later developing structures (for example, object relatives with relativized objects: “The napkin covers the wolf that the basket is holding”).
  • Following Directions. In each chapter, students are presented with 20 commands, for a total of 80 per story. Within each set of commands, the difficulty level increases from less complex (“Touch the red hat and the green cup”) to more complex (“Put the small orange fish between the red dish and the blue basket”).


Advancement

After the student has responded to all trials in a story, Cosmic Reader evaluates the student’s performance across all chapters and activities in the story. The student must meet the following criteria to advance to the next story.

  • Listening Comprehension. The student must answer 100% of the 16 trials in the story correctly. Cosmic Reader evaluates each chapter independently for listening comprehension. Once the student meets the listening comprehension criterion for a given chapter, the student will not repeat the narration or the listening comprehension trials for that chapter.
  • English Grammar. The student must answer 90% of the 144 trials in the story correctly (130 out of 144 correct).
    • Chicken Licken only requires 89 out of 98 of the least difficult trials correct; the remaining 46 trials are presented as additional practice.
  • Following Directions. The student must answer 90% of the 80 trials in the story correctly (72 out of 80 correct)
    • Chicken Licken only requires 36 of the 40 least difficult trials correct; the remaining 40 trials are presented as additional practice


Mastery

To complete the exercise, the student must master all of the skills in the exercise and reach a percent complete score of 100%. If the exercise is revisited, the student will continue to repeat the content at the highest levels. To learn more see Completing a component.




How Cosmic Reader rewards progress

Session points. The exercise awards points as follows:

  • 4 points for each correct response
  • 20 bonus points for completing a story
  • 20 bonus points for making “3 in a row” correct 10 times in the Listening Comprehension and English Grammar activities
  • 20 bonus points for making “3 in a row” correct 5 times in the Following Directions activity

Feeder meter. The feeder meter tracks and celebrates every 1% of content completion. At 10% complete, the meter is full, and it “feeds” that percentage into the progress meter and resets. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report

Progress meter. The progress meter tracks and celebrates every 10% of content completion. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all 10 markers light up, the exercise is complete. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Completion status. The completion status sign shows the actual percent complete score for the exercise. The score updates each time the student completes 1%. For more on percent complete scores see the student’s Progress report.

Current streak (3 in a row). At the start of each new session, the exercise tracks and shows the current “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. After 3 consecutive correct trials in a session, a “3 in a row” sign slides onto the screen. The score increments until the streak is broken (on the first incorrect trial), at which point the sign disappears from view. The current streak sign resets to zero at the end of each streak, and at the start of the next session.

Highest streak. At the start of each new day, the exercise tracks and shows the student’s best “winning streak” of consecutive correct trials. The score appears after the first 3 consecutive correct trials, and remains on the screen throughout the day. Any time the student surpasses his or her highest streak that day, the sign updates to show the latest number. The highest streak score resets to zero at the start of the next day.

More rewards. In addition to the current streak sign, the exercise uses other fun animations to encourage progress.

  • Each work session includes a performance goal to help motivate the student. In Cosmic Reader, the student’s goal is to reach the target marker. As the student works toward the goal, the progress marker advances. When the student meets the goal, a performance marker appears at the top of the screen. Once earned, these rewards cannot be lost; these performance markers will remain visible until the entire component is finished.

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서울특별시 중구 남대문로 117, 11층(다동, 동아빌딩) I 대표 최인태ㅣ사업자등록번호 120-86-76429ㅣ통신판매업신고 제2016-서울중구-0735호 개인정보관리 책임자 최인태ㅣ제안 및 고객(사업)최고책임자 ceo@nslearning.co.kr

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